Graham Wylie

Graham Wylie  Businessman Graham Wylie is the most successful owner in the North of England and, together with his wife, Andrea, has had 13 winners at the Cheltenham Festival. Initially, the Wylies were the principal patrons of County Durham trainer Howard Johnson, to whom they were fiercely loyal. In those early years, the Wylies were best known as the owners of Inglis Drever, the first horse to win the Stayers’ Hurdle three times, in 2005, 2007 and 2008, but their distinctive beige and black colours were also carried to victory by Arcalis in the Supreme Novices’ Hurdle and No Refuge in the Royal & SunAlliance Novices’ Hurdle in 2005 and Tidal Bay in the Arkle Challenge Trophy in 2008.

 

However, in 2011 a disciplinary inquiry conducted by the British Horseracing Authority concluded that Johnson had shown “a reckless regard” for the rules on horse welfare and warned him off for four years. Johnson immediately announced his retirement, leaving Graham Wylie to “think about” his own involvement in racing. Wylie downscaled his operation, selling many of his horses and dispersing the remainder to the best trainers on either side of the Irish Sea, in his opinion, Paul Nicholls in Britain and Willie Mullins in Ireland.

 

In fact, it was Mullins who saddled his next two Cheltenham Festival winners, Back In Focus in the National Hunt Chase and Briar Hill in the Weatherbys Champion Bumper in 2013. After drawing a blank in 2014 and 2015, the Wylies returned to the winners’ enclosure three times in 2016, courtesy of Solar Impulse, trained by Paul Nicholls, in the Grand Annual Chase and Black Hercules and Yorkhill, both trained by Willie Mullins, in the JLT Novices’ Chase and the Neptune Investment Management Novices’ Hurdle, respectively. In 2017, they won the JLT Novices’ Chase again, with Yorkhill, and completed a notable double with Nicholls Canyon, also trained by Mullins, in the Stayers’ Hurdle.

Cheltenham racing tips for next year’s edition

Cheltenham racing tips for next year’s edition  If you’re interested in the opportunity to bet on one of the UK’s most exciting horse racing events, it would be worth considering Cheltenham racing tips that you could form for the highly-regarded festival. Often referred to as ‘The Festival’, Cheltenham Festival is one of the biggest and best events on the National Hunt racing calendar, with people flocking across the country in order to get a glimpse of the action.

 

Why so many people bet on Cheltenham Festival

 

Due to the array of different races that are held over the four-day event, it’s no real surprise to discover that so many punters and fans place their bets on Cheltenham racing tips that they’ve picked up along the way. Horse racing is such a popular sport when it comes to placing bets that you’re likely to find a similar selection of tips for the many football fixtures which take place throughout the week, but nothing quite beats key race meetings like the Cheltenham Gold Cup, Aintree Grand National, Epsom Derby and St Leger Stakes.

 

While the possibility of horse racing tips online is to be expected for all major races, you’ll find that a lot of these races are held at Cheltenham Racecourse, which makes it an even more enticing event to get involved in, as so many of the country’s main race meetings are part of Cheltenham Festival.

 

Getting behind Cheltenham racing tips

 

As so many people choose to get involved with betting on Cheltenham Festival, the bookies offer prices for each race several months in advance, with punters choosing which horses they fancy well before any fluctuations in terms of the odds-on horse racing. This is often known as ante post betting, and it’s something that more experienced punters will do to make sure that they’ve locked in the best available price.

 

If you want to find horse racing tips to get behind, there is an extensive selection of horse racing tipster websites online that allow you to join them with their bets, including Cheltenham racing tips. You’re also able to make your own horse racing bets, where all you need to do is look into the form of each horse to work out which nag looks likely to win their next race. Newcomers to betting on the sport are likely to stick by their gut instinct, which is something that you can’t really knock as long as you’re betting in a responsible manner.

Gordon Elliott

Gordon Elliott  Co. Meath trainer Gordon Elliott first took out a training licence in 2007 and saddled his first Cheltenham Festival winner, Chicago Grey, in the National Hunt Chase in 2011. Five years later, he saddled Don Cossack, owned by Gigginstown House Stud and ridden by 23-year-old Bryan Cooper – who, according to Elliott, had given the horse a ‘diabolical’ ride when a beaten favourite in the Ryanair Chase in 2015 – to win the Cheltenham Gold Cup.

 

More recently, in 2017, Elliott saddled six Festival winners and beat Willie Mullins to the Leading Trainer Award on countback, by virtue of three second-placed horses to Mullins’ two. In 2018, the victory of Blow By Blow in the Martin Pipe Conditional Jockeys’ Handicap Hurdle on the Friday took his total for the meeting to eight winners, equalling the record set by Mullins three years earlier and pipping his compatriot to the Leading Trainer Award, for the second year running, by one winner.

 

Of course, Elliott was the chief beneficiary Gigginstown House Stud removed all 60 of its horses from Mullins’ yard in September, 2016, following a dispute over training fees. In fact, in 2018, Elliott saddled two so-called ‘bankers’ in Michael O’Leary’s distinctive maroon and white colours, Apple’s Jade, only third, at 1/2, in the OLBG Mares’ Hurdle on Champion Day and Samcro, winner of the Ballymore Novices’ Hurdle on Ladies’ Day at 8/11. Other winners for Gigginstown House Stud, trained by Elliott, were Tiger Roll in the Glenfarclas Cross Country Chase, Shattered Love in the JLT Novices’ Chase, Delta Work in the Pertemps Network Final and Farclas in the JCB Triumph Hurdle.

 

Although something of a new kid on the block, when compared with Cheltenham stalwarts such as Willie Mullins, Nicky Henderson and Paul Nicholls, Gordon Elliott clearly has the ammunition to compete with the ‘old guard’ and seems likely to become a fixture at Prestbury Park when March rolls around each year.