Cheltenham racing tips for next year’s edition

Cheltenham racing tips for next year’s edition  If you’re interested in the opportunity to bet on one of the UK’s most exciting horse racing events, it would be worth considering Cheltenham racing tips that you could form for the highly-regarded festival. Often referred to as ‘The Festival’, Cheltenham Festival is one of the biggest and best events on the National Hunt racing calendar, with people flocking across the country in order to get a glimpse of the action.

 

Why so many people bet on Cheltenham Festival

 

Due to the array of different races that are held over the four-day event, it’s no real surprise to discover that so many punters and fans place their bets on Cheltenham racing tips that they’ve picked up along the way. Horse racing is such a popular sport when it comes to placing bets that you’re likely to find a similar selection of tips for the many football fixtures which take place throughout the week, but nothing quite beats key race meetings like the Cheltenham Gold Cup, Aintree Grand National, Epsom Derby and St Leger Stakes.

 

While the possibility of horse racing tips online is to be expected for all major races, you’ll find that a lot of these races are held at Cheltenham Racecourse, which makes it an even more enticing event to get involved in, as so many of the country’s main race meetings are part of Cheltenham Festival.

 

Getting behind Cheltenham racing tips

 

As so many people choose to get involved with betting on Cheltenham Festival, the bookies offer prices for each race several months in advance, with punters choosing which horses they fancy well before any fluctuations in terms of the odds-on horse racing. This is often known as ante post betting, and it’s something that more experienced punters will do to make sure that they’ve locked in the best available price.

 

If you want to find horse racing tips to get behind, there is an extensive selection of horse racing tipster websites online that allow you to join them with their bets, including Cheltenham racing tips. You’re also able to make your own horse racing bets, where all you need to do is look into the form of each horse to work out which nag looks likely to win their next race. Newcomers to betting on the sport are likely to stick by their gut instinct, which is something that you can’t really knock as long as you’re betting in a responsible manner.

Master Oats

Master Oats  Master Oats, who died in 2012, at the age of 28, after a long and happy retirement, is best remembered for winning the Cheltenham Gold Cup in 1995. In so doing, he completed a famous big race double for trainer Kim Bailey and jockey Norman Williamson, who’d won the Champion Hurdle with Alderbrook two days earlier.

In the early part of his career, Master Oats hardly looked a champion, but a bad bleed after winning at Uttoxeter prompted a change of training tactics, which set him on the road to Cheltenham glory. At a rain-sodden Prestbury Park, he was sent off 100/30 favourite, but after a couple of unsettling mistakes at the eighth and ninth fences, made a monumental blunder at the eleventh, which Norman Williamson was lucky to survive. Survive he did, though, and Master Oats led after the second last and drew away in the closing stages to beat his old rival, the mare Dubacilla, by 15 lengths.

All in all, Master Oats won 10 of his 21 starts over fences, including the Rehearsal Chase at Chepstow, the Coral Welsh National at Newbury (transferred from Chepstow) and the Pillar Property Investments Chase at Cheltenham, as well as the Cheltenham Gold Cup, in the same 1994/95 season. His Timeform Annual Rating of 183 is the same as more recent Cheltenham Gold Cup winners Denman and Don Cossack and 1lb superior to Best Mate.

Master Oats also ran three times in the Grand National. He fell for the only time in his career at the second last fence on the first circuit in 1994, but finished seventh on his attempt to become the first horse since Golden Miller to complete the Cheltenham Gold Cup – Grand National double in 1995 and fifth, under 11st 10lb, on his final racecourse in 1997.

Alderbrook

Alderbrook  Alderbrook, who died in 2007, at the age of 18, after a highly successful stud campaign, was a useful performer on the Flat, but will always be remembered for his remarkable victory in the Champion Hurdle in 1995. The six-year-old was not only a first Cheltenham Festival winner for trainer Kim Bailey and jockey Norman Williamson, but also the least experienced horse ever to win a Champion Hurdle, after just two previous starts over obstacles.

 

Alderbrook was first tried over hurdles, without much distinction, by his previous trainer Sally Hall, as a three-year-old in December 1992. However, having developed into a Group class performer on the Flat for new trainer Kim Bailey, he didn’t race again under National Hunt rules until the Kingwell Hurdle at Wincanton in February 1995. On that occasion, he was always going well and quickened clear on the run-in to beat Trying Again by 8 lengths.

 

Entered in the Champion Hurdle almost as an afterthought by owner Eric Pick, after intensive coaching by celebrated equine guru Yogi Bresner Alderbrook was sent off at just 11/2, behind joint favourites Large Action and Danoli at 4/1. His performance was almost a carbon copy of that of Wincanton; he made steady headway on the bit from just after halfway, challenged at the final flight and quickened clear in the closing stages to beat his nearest market rivals by 5 lengths and 2 lengths.

 

Alderbrook ran just three more times over hurdles, comfortably winning two Grade 2 contests, including the Scottish Champion Hurdle and finishing second, beaten 2½, behind Collier Bay in the Champion Hurdle proper in 1996.